Abbott World Marathon Majors Official Pic

Finally Abbott WMM have released the photos they took right after we crossed the finish line and were handed our Six Star Finisher Medal. I was at that point so exhausted I didn’t even bother to ask the photographer to take the shot from a higher angle to avoid the double chin that inevitably occurs when taking a photo from a low angle. But, you know what? I don’t care, so here is my official pic, major double chin and all…

5 Marathons on my Bucket List

Alas, so the great Abbott World Marathon Majors-adventure has come to an end. Or, at least to a pause; the rumor is that they are actually expanding from 6 to 8 or 9 marathons within short. When decided, we of course will need to run these, so that we can maintain or status as Abbott 6/8/9 Star Finishers.

But while waiting for this, I have made a bucket list of the marathon I would really like to wog/run. Prior to Tokyo Marathon I had more or less decided to just complete there and then burn my running shoes in firm belief that I would never be a runner. Now, however, I am not that sure… Or, I am quite sure I will never be a runner, but maybe I should aspire for being the best wogger I can be? I have completed 13 marathons, but I have never really been prepared (meaning enough long runs before the race). When you are aiming for a 42,2 km, it isn’t sufficient with 30-45 minute sessions. I was, for not foreseeable reasons, not able to do any long runs prior to our travel to Tokyo, so I was only able to do a 15km. Since I lasted about 18 km, I feel that I have some improvement potential if I can only get some more long-runs.

To boost my motivation to become a better runner/wogger, I have created a bucket list of marathons I would like to participate in.

1. Honolulu Marathon

Honolulu Marathon is scheduled for December each year, which brings a temperature equal to a wonderful Norwegian summer. A bit too hot for some, maybe, but for a frozen wogger, is just perfect. Ever since I spent a few weeks on Honolulu 12 years ago, I have wanted to return, so why not kill 2 birds with one stone and do a marathon while I am there?

The advantage of Honolulu Marathon is that it is not that difficult to secure a start number, meaning the cost will mostly be just air fare and hotel. If you don’t want the hazzle of booking by yourself, you can book a complete package from a travel agent. The course is mostly flat, but with some rough places between 10 and 15 km and between 35 and 40 km.

2. Great Wall Marathon

The Great wall has an amazing and I have been quite fascinated with it since I was a kid. The Great Wall Marathon is considered a tought course and you will have to conquer over 5000 steps along the way! Fortunately you have an 8 hours time limit, but you need to have passed 34 km in 6 hours in order to be allowed to complete. Step practice anyone?

The race is in May each year and I have seen that e.g. Albatros Adventure Marathons sells complete travel packages that includes a start number.

3. Paris Marathon

I know nothing about Paris Marathon other than that it is in April each year and that the finishing line is on top of Champs Elysses . That is all the reasons I need in order to include this marathon on my bucket list (hey, we are talking about “The City of Love” here!). It should be fairly easy to secure a start number on your own, but you can also do it through a travel agent.

The course looks a bit scruffy and ends with a slow slope up Champs Elysses.

4. Praha Marathon

Prague is an amazing city I never grow tired of; fantastic architecture, a rich cultural life, delicious foods and cheap beer. I mean, what is not to like, so why not go “all in” and throw a marathon into the mix as well?

Prague Marathon is in May every year and the course takes you through both the old and new parts of the city, including crossing the Charles Bridge. The time limit is cosy 7 hours, so here you can really combine easy jog with sightseeing. I am not sure if any of the Norwegian travel agents are offering Prague Marathon, but it should be fairy easy to secure a start number on your own.

5. Medoc Marathon

So, last but not least, Medoc Marathon. This marathon is known for its runners’ costumes (this year’s theme is: Super Heros) and the fact that you run through vines and that all drinking stations supply wine. Official time limit is 6:30, but sometimes they extend this limit since many of the runners are starting to get wine happy.

The program is set and shuttles will bring you to and front the start/finisher area, so it should be OK to arrange everything on your own. Me, however, think I would like to prefer to book the trip through e.g. Springtime.

So, this was my bucket list. Do you guys have any suggestions that should be included in the list? If so, feel free to comment below..

Hairdos Through the Decades

Beach-do

Some people just seems to pull off anything, also any kind of hairdos. I mean, take Natalie Portman for example; she looks just as amazing being bold, short haired, long haired, brunette or blonde. Me, I am not one of those people, and this post is my shameful and quite frankly very embarrassing proof of that… f

My history starts around 44 years ago, where I was born screaming and kicking and not to mention bold. I have heard stories about 3 months old babies with quite a set of hair, while my bold, little head didn’t need scissors before the age of 3 (me on the left below).

After a few years, even my hair started to grow, but I never got this thick or curly hair I envied my friends for. I was stuck with my flat, home cut blonde hair and up until I started school, me and my brother had the exact same hairdo.

Big-brother-tricks-little-sister-into-being-a-horse-do:

Bathtub-do:

Big-brother’s-first-day-to-school-do:

Then it was my turn to start school, and by then I had grown at least enough hair to have pony tails. Still home cut, obviously….

Runner-up-in-May-Flower-competition-do:

Big-teeth-do:

In my final year at elementary school, I got this great idea to cut my hair short and with a hockey neck (hey, it was the 80-ies). This had to be done at a proper hairdresser, but what we hadn’t thought of is that such a do has to be maintained at least monthly and that cost was not exactly in our budget. Every three months was more like it, leading to the do-being quite flat and straight up ugly (even by that decade’s standards) for the last couple of months. Add a couple of plastic ear lobes and you have the answer for why I missed out on my first kiss in elementary school.

At lower secondary school (ages 13-16) I came once again up with a not so brilliant ide; home perm. Picture this; a bit of a flubby girl with a tiny head, a botch home perm-do and a big, fluffy jacket of the cheap kind.

My at-least-I-have-a-bird-friend-do:

Sweet 16 do:

Confirmation do:

My last year at the lower secondary school, I (fortunately) stopped experimenting and went for a more safe do for a few years, and hey… I got my first kiss 🙂

My volleyball-do:

Throughout high school I continued to play it safe, with long, straight hair. My experimental inner self turned its attention to clothes instead, but that is another (and just as tragic) story.

Norwegian-cup-in-volleyball-at-16-do:

Norwegian-cup-in-volleyball-at-17-do:

Larvik-volleyball-do:

Then I entered my 20-ies where I revisited my experimental side. At that time I practiced several times a day, so a short do was the most practical one. Even if it made me look like a boy….

Bulgary-at-20-do:

In my mid-20-ies, i lived in Oslo and one day I just decided to color my hair black!! With my pale, white face and that terrible black hair, I looked more like a lucky-troll than anything else.

Lucky-troll-do:

And of course, realizing my mistake and wanting my blondness back, I had to go through a more carrot-colored phase since I did not had the funds to do a proper coloring at a salon.

Carrot-do:

After a while, I regained my natural hair color, but I kept the short do into the new millennium.

Y2000K-do:

At 30, I felt that my experimental phase was over and since then I have stayed away from both very short hair, perm, black color and home cut hair. I have, however, alternated between long and half-long hair.

Wedding-with-several-hundred-clips-to-keep-my-not-so-long-hair-in-place-do:

My prosecco-happy-do:

Am-on-vacation-in-Granca-with-junior-and-haven’t-washed-my-hair-today-but-really-don’t-care-do:

Christmas-in-Dubai-do:

Sweat-and-cold-at-once-but-I-got-the-NY-Marathon-medal-do:

Slick-look-after-Berlin-Marathon-in-heavy-rain-do:

Sari-with-my-hair-in-a-bun-to-avoid-lice-visually-jumping-around-me-at-the-local-bus-do:

Idiot-taking-a-bath-in-April-do:

Pregnant-in-Hawaii-do:

Sweat-and-sleep-deprived-mom-do:

In-love-in-Eurodisney-do:

Barecelona-2018-do:

I started this post by saying that some people can get away with wearing anything. Well, I have found an exception, because absolutely NO ONE can pull off this jacket to a cost of approx USD 7.500, even though many thought they could since the jackets were quickly sold out (#WhatsUpWithTheBratz).

Foto: Getty Images

Tokyo Marathon – 8 things you should know

It has already been a week sine I crawled over the finishing line in Tokyo Marathon and was awarded both the Tokyo Marathon finisher medal and the fabulous Six Star Finisher medal. A fantastic experience! In this post I have collected some valuable information worth knowing about if you consider running in the Tokyo Marathon.

1. Registering

The qualifying time for Tokyo Marathon is quite difficult to achieve, but no need to worry if you are not in that exclusive group, sine there are alternative means to secure a spot. One way is to enter the lottery, but with over 300.000 applicants (2018 numbers) the chances of winning a start place is quite slim. The results from the ballot are not published before September, meaning if you don’t succeed, chances of securing a spot are small.

One alternative to qualifying or succeed in the ballot is to buy a spot through a travel agent. Usually their program is quite professionally put together, but the disadvantage is that it is expensive.

What we did was to secure our spots through charity. The charity registering opened last year in early July, meaning a couple of months before we get the ballot results, and already a couple of days later, all the spots were taken. What you have to do is enter the homepage of Tokyo Marathon and enter as a charity runner (in 2019 they had 4000 charity spots), choose your charity, pay in the minimum donation of 100.000 JPY (approx. USD 800). It is important that you both enter as a charity runner and pay the specified JPY at once, or else your registration is invalid. If you have done it correctly, you will get a mail confirming your spot. Just to be safe, make sure you read ALL the information before entering as a charity runner.

2. Pre-Race Information

After entering as a charity runner in the beginning of July, we did not hear anything from Tokyo Marathon until the beginning of February, where we got the bib-number registration and the runner handbook. After that we received regular update mails up until race day. It is important that you read the runner handbook really thoroughly, since it contains information about what is allowed into the starting area, as well as an overview of cutoff-times.

3. Expo

We did struggle a bit with founding the expo, much due to us taking a taxi since it was raining heavily that day. The taxi driver, however, didn’t speak a word of English and managed to drop us off at the wrong place. Guess we would have been better off taking the metro instead. The expo was split between several big tents, which was not very practical in the rain. It was quick to register and get our bib number and then we were ready for some shopping. The main shopping stand for Asics were fortunately in a warm tent with a dry floor, but the rest of the stands were either in tents with watery floors or outside. In other words, not very tempting to shop, so I ended up just with a couple of T-shirts. One tip when it comes to buying clothes both at the expo or else in Japan, is to always try them on, since they are operating in Japanese sizes that are considerably smaller than ours. I ended up buying size XL instead of my regular M/L.

The opening times for the expo was:

4. Metro-card

Along with the bib-number we got a metro card, valid for 24 hours; a really nice touch. We chose to take the JR line (train) to the start line instead of the metro, so we saved our cards for them to be valid at another date instead.

5. Starting area

Then we have reached the race day. The starting area for 2019 was at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, and the nearest station was Shinjuku station. This is actually the worlds most buzziest station with over 3,5 millioner daily passengers and has 200+ exits. We were a bit concerned that we would get lost in there, but it turned out that it was nothing to worry about. From the moment we stepped out of the train, we were met by volunteers with signs showing us which way to go and they continued until we reached our gate (we were to enter through gate 3). At the gate we had to have our wristband scanned to verify identity and then our bags were manually checked for prohibited items. Luckily all this happened while we were still inside the station, so that we weren’t getting wet, at least not yet.

The first group of toilets were under roof and the lines were endless. But, it turned out that the lines were quickly executed and volunteers made sure the lines were in perfect order. One guy stood in the back of the line with a sign saying that the line started there. In the beginning of the line there were additional volunteers telling you when it was your turn and also which toilet to use. Unfortunately the toilets were of the squatting kind, so I managed with just that one visit to the bathroom.

Turning in my baggage went also OK. A smart detail was that our bib number was marked with which car to deliver your luggage to.

The Runner’s handbook contains a list of all the timings for the starting area. Make sure that you read and keep these limits or else you will not be allowed to start:

6. The Course

The course starts with about 5 km downhill before it flattens out and remain flat for the rest of the run. It takes the runners through both old and modern Tokyo and in multiple parts, you will see the quicker runners running in the opposite direction. A lot of interesting sights to view along the course, not that I would know since yours truly was more occupied with looking down in the ground and yelling at my legs to keep on going.

7. The Run

Then we are finally at the run itself. I started in the last corral (L), so it took about 30 minutes from gun time at 09:10 for me to cross the starting line. One major difference from other marathons is that Tokyo Marathon practices a course time limit of 7 hours from gun time and not from when you cross the starting area, meaning my real time limit was 06:30. They also have cutoff points approx. every 5 km and they are strongly enfored due to the need to open the roads for traffic again. To try to get as many runners to finish the race, the run had Finish Support-runners, dressed in golden colors and with gold balloons and if they ran passed you better speed up, because if your are behind them at the cutoff checkpoint, then you are out of the race. A lot of runners didn’t know about the mid-course cutoff places and some acted with rage when forced to leave the run (example). The link shows an American that doesn’t exactly take the defeat in an honorable way, but choose to yell at the volunteers and the whole thing is really embarrasing.

As mentioned, the gun time is at 09:10 and below you can view the cutoff times, which are to be found in the Runner’s handbook:

I have never taken a toilet break during my 13 completed marathons, much due to me running so slow that I have no time to spare. I did, however, hear about runners spending 10-15 minutes in line for the toilets along the course, so the best advice is to try to keep it in as long as possible.

From about 5 km you will find drinking station about every 3 km. All of these have water and every second has sports drink. At the various stations also gel, bananas, and other types of energy are offered. A complete list of what you will get at the different stations can be found in the Runner’s handbook.

The Japanese are from childhood trained in not throwing garbage but to bring it home with them and in Tokyo the streets are so clean you can practically eat off them. At each drinking station there were lots of boxes for discarding your drinking cups. In addition you had volunteers every 100m or so, holding up bags for us to discard our garbage. Even with these precautions, a disappointed number of runners managed to just throw their cups and gels on the street. I mean, I do understand the elite group not doing this, but it should be that hard for the rest of the runners.

8. Finishing Area

The finishing area was just as organized as the rest of the marathon and when we finally crossed the finishing line, we were promptly met by a water station and a goodie bag station, a station for aluminum blankets, one for the finisher medal and also a separate station for those receiving the Six Star Finisher medal (meaning you have completed marathons in Boston, Chicago, New York, Berlin, London and Tokyo). A huge moment!

Further on we were led to our baggage and then to a separate building for charity runners where we could change our clothes and warm ourselves.

I also heard rumors that those having registered at the expo that they were not to bring any baggage to the starting line, got a poncho and a fleece jacket. I did not, however, see any of those, since I had more than enough looking out for my self.

These are some of the reflections I made before, during and after the run and I hope they can be of help to others who are to participate in Tokyo Marathon, an adventure I would really recommend. 🙂

Tokyo – Elephant Feet From Hell

Friday was the departure date from Japan and I left Tokyo with somehow ambivalent feelings. On the one side, there was still so much to see (and eat), but on the other (and definetely the most dominant one) side, I was longing to see Christer (junior) again, after 9 days of Skyping.

I hour train ride, almost 12 hour first leg flight, sprinting through the airport in Copenhagen, another 1 hour flight and a short taxi ride later, we were finally home. Our luggage, however, didn’t sprint as well in Copenhagen, so they never made it to Sandefjord.

It was so good to see Christer again and he actually took it well when I told him that the Japanese candy I had bought for him was in my suitcase. Something that was definetely not in my suitcase, but where lying safely in my hand luggage, were my 2 new medals and my first order of business (even before taking a shower after 20 hours of travelling) was to hang them in their rightfulky place on the Wall of Fame. There is something so right about this picture, right?

As earlier mentioned, the trip home was a bit bumpy and I did notice (while sprinting through the airport) that my feet were not fully pn my side. Granted I felt a bit flubby from before after binging on delicacies of the fabulous Japanese cuisine for the last 9 days, but this was somewhat unexpected. Check out the size on my legs after the long flight (from last night and from earlier this morning)!! Have you seen worse?

All in all it was OK to be back at home, but what I don’t appreciate is the weather goods already messing with me and in the form of MORE SNOW!!! Now thatwe were finally gotten rid og the old one (sigh…).

Tokyo – Finally time for sumo wrestling

Today is unfortunately our last day in Tokyo and what better way to finish off than with some sumo wrestling? To us westerners seeing 2 flubby men in a skimpy little outfit can seem a bit strange, but here in Japan it’s the national sport and the wrestlers are idolized.

We had hoped to see a genuin sumo wrestling match, but unfortunately none were to be arranged during our stay. Instead we settled for an organized tour, ordered through getyourguide.com, but arranged by a local operator. It included an introduction to the sport by some retired wrestlers as well as a show-match. A very touristy thing to do of course, but hey, we wanted to see sumo wrestling, and this was the only viable option to obtain that. The price was about USD 110 and the activity also included the option of going against one of the wrestlers (spoler alert: I skipped that…) and lunch.

We were to meet up in the Ryoguku area, famous for its many sumo stables. We had a bit of a hard time finding the placesince the entrance felt like just a whole in the wall, but we had predicted this, so we still had some time to spare when we finally reached our destination.

We were greeted by an amicable middelaged Japanese lady, who fortunately spoke English fluently. She took us to our table, located in a big room with a big mat in one end. Around the room we saw memoribilis of two wrestlers’ former glory.

Soon the show started and we got to meet the wrestlers (which names I heard, but managed to forget like 5 seconds later). They took us through the rules, warm-ups and techniques, all in Japanese of course, but the lady from before translated with

The wrestlers also did 3 show matches, where the big one (still do not remember his name ) won 2-1.

Before the lunch was served, we learned that sumo wrestlers cook their own food. They actually get so experienced in cooking that 50% of them choose the restaurant business as their second careere. They only eat two times a day, but then they eat a lot. The guy below revealed that when he was active he was able to eat up to 300 shushi pcs in one single meal, but now he is down to like a hundred.

The lunch was like all other food we have tasted in Japan; really tasty. We got a «Chanko Nabe», a real sumo lunch consisting of a hot pot with vegetables, proteins an chicken broth.

Unfortunately this was our last activity in the amazing city which is Tokyo. Tomorrow we go home, so tickets to the express train have been purchased and our suitcases (nearly) packed. So long, Tokyo, hope to see you again.

Tokyo – Karaoke Time!

It would have been a real shame leaving Tokyo without experiencing karaoke, so yesterday we looked up the venues in the neighbourhood for a night of singing. The choice fell on Big Echo Karaokebar, only a 10 minute walk from our Marunouchi hotel.

Before we booked a table at the karaoke bar, however, we made a pitstop for som food and (lots of drinks) at the bar next door as a warm-up. Then we booked a private room with a big TV screen and two micriphones for the six of us (with additional drinks to further loosen up the vocal cords…).

Earlier in the day, a couple of the boys were a bit sceptical of the whole karaoke and claimed audience status only. But, being in the room with a drink in their hand, made that scepticism evaporate within minutes. The whole room took off and we all went all in singing wise. We (of course) felt that we were really nailing it, but in retrospect, I think we made a wise call deciding to prohibit autio/video recording of the seance.

Our plan was to only book the room for like 30 minutes to an hour, but 3,5 hour later the staff practically had to force the microphones out of our hands. A super fun experience, and the possibility og booking a private room made even the shyest of us break out in singing.